Futurism

Belief in Science

Faith in the Future


Introduction | Rational Religion | Responsibilities | Conservation vs. Evolution | Against Anti-science | Logo | Beliefs


The futurian logo

The futurian logo was created by the founder of the movement, Kate Craig-Wood. It has layered meanings:

The central circle started as a yin yang. In this context it was originally intended to symbolise life in the broader context and more specifically humanity; there are many aspects of our selves which is a mixture of two elements, most notably our two genders, but also more intangible philosophical concepts like good and evil. When considering the larger picture there are binary theoretical concepts like order and chaos too. It is that last which perhaps most symbolises us, for life can be viewed as nothing more than a fight against the apparently unstoppable force of entropy, which in fighting it accelerates it - life is arguably nothing more than a localised increase in order at the expense of increased regional disorder.

It can also symbolise the two pillars of Futurism: science and technology. Those compound and interact leading to yet more of both, computer and medical sciences being just two examples, in an exponential process. Our own interaction with science and technology is a similarly compounding, exponential process, thus two to the power two gives us four (the four-way yin-yang).

Just taking one binary aspect as an example; Kate and many of her friends consider themselves to have transcended gender and no longer views it as a binary. She is, arguably, among the first trans-humans, having been modified by medical technology and becoming something different, able to experience society in a way1 not possible only a few decades ago.

However, more importantly and simplistically the four-way "yin yang" also symbolises a wheel or propeller - emblems of technology - and its suggestion of motion symbolises the advance of science and technology.

The outer symbol is borrowed from pagan traditions (see page on religousness). It is the Goddess triple moon, and in this context is being used to symbolise nature in the broadest context; both the Earth but also the Universe. The moon is perhaps the best symbol for this since its image has perhaps alone above all else drawn us to question beyond the mundane of our lives and wonder at what the larger picture holds.

So, when combined together, the symbol as a whole represents humanity constantly evolving with the relentless advance of science and technology, but doing so in harmony with nature and the universe.

Rights / using the logo

Please note that the logo is an internationally registered design. You may use it provided that you do so in conjunction with a link back to this site.


© Kate Craig-Wood 2012